Sus armas: en campo de plata, sobre un monte, de sable, sobre el lado derecho cuatro robles de los que sale un lobo pasante que va hacia la izquierda, todo ello de su color natural.

O'Callaghan / Callaghan / Callahan

Origen: Irlandés. El apellido O'Callaghan ó Callahan, en irlandés O'Ceallachain, fue tomado de Ceallachan, rey de Munster que murió en 952, ascendiente epónimo del clan, que al ser desposeído de su territorio después de la invasión anglo-normanda, se aseuntó en Cork y allí quedó hasta ser nuevamente desposeído bajo el régimen de Cromwell, trasladándose entonces su familia más conocida a Clare, condado en que la aldea de O'Callaghan's Mills perpetúa su nombre. John O'Hart da armas similares a las descriptas y dice que los de este apellido descienden del ya recordado Ceallachan, que es el nº 104 en el pedigree de los MacCarthy Mor. Cuatro O'CALLAGHAN figuran registrados entre los pasajeros entrados al puerto de Buenos Aires entre diciembre de 1825 y marzo de 1866. Before Irish names were translated into English, Callaghan had a Gaelic form of O Ceallachain, possibly from ceallach, which means strife. The family is descended from Ceallachan (Callaghan), the 10th century King of Munster from whom their surname is derived. First found in Munster where they were seated from very ancient times.

Variantes: Callaghan, Callahan, O'Callaghan, O'Callahan, Calahan, Cellaghan, Kalahan, Kallaghan, Kallahan, O'Kallaghan, Kellaghan, Kelleghan, Kellahan, Kelahan, Ceilahan, Ceilaghan, Callachan, Calachan, Callagan, Calagan, Kelagan, Callighan, Kealachan, y otros.

The princely house of O'Callaghan descends in unbroken male line from Morrough, second son of Ceallachan Caisil (Callaghan Cashel), King of Munster who died in the year 952. Morrough was thus the younger brother of Donnchad II of Munster, ancestor of the House of MacCarthy Mór. Closely related or not there was, at first, bitter and prolonged rivalry between the descendants of Morrough and King Donnchad. Because the succession to the throne of Munster was not determined by primogeniture but by tanistry, it was natural for the O'Callaghans to aspire to the Crown of their ancestor, Ceallachan, from whom they derived their surname.

Don Juan O'Callaghan, The O'Callaghan, titular Lord of Clonmeen, is Chief of the Name and Arms of O'Callaghan and a member of the Standing Council of Irish Chiefs and Chieftains. Born in 1934 he is the eldest son of the late Don Juan O'Callaghan, The O'Callaghan, by his wife Dona Enriquetta Casas. The Chief is married with issue.

Clan O'Callaghan

The princely house of O'Callaghan descends in unbroken male line from Morrough, second son of Ceallachan Caisil (Callaghan Cashel), King of Munster who died in the year 952. Morrough was thus the younger brother of Donnchad II of Munster, ancestor of the House of MacCarthy Mór. Closely related or not there was, at first, bitter and prolonged rivalry between the descendants of Morrough and King Donnchad. Because the succession to the throne of Munster was not determined by primogeniture but by tanistry, it was natural for the O'Callaghans to aspire to the Crown of their ancestor, Ceallachan, from whom they derived their surname.

The dynastic rivalry between these two great branches of the Eóghanacht Chaisil dynasty was intense for over fifty years and in 1092 Callaghan O'Callaghan slew his cousins the brothers Muiredach MacCarthy, King of Cashel, and Donnough MacCarthy, Rioghdamna of Cashel. Eventually realising that the strife between the two houses was of benefit only to the Dá gCais, the O'Callaghans finally acknowledged the claims of their MacCarthy cousins to the crown of Desmond, supporting King Tadgh I MacCarthy (obit. 1124) against the O'Briens of Thomond. In the course of this civil war, which gave rise to the division of Munster into the Kingdoms of Desmond and Thomond, the O'Callaghans were driven from their ancestral lands, near Cashel, and resettled in Clonmeen as feudal vassals of the MacCarthy Mór Kings and their cadet line the MacDonogh MacCarthy Lords of Duhallow.

The O'Callaghan Chiefs were inaugurated as such, and installed as Lords of Clonmeen, by the MacCarthy Mórs. This relationship continued until the very dissolution of the Kingdom of Desmond with the death of King Donal IX MacCarthy Mór in 1596. A few years preceeding his death King Donal issued a charter, dated July 20th 1590, confirming Conogher O'Callaghan as Chief of his Name and Lord of Clonmeen. The O'Callaghans survived the collapse of Gaelic Desmond and for another generation enjoyed the lordship of Clonmeen. During the Cromwellian Wars the then Chief, Donogh O'Callaghan, served as both a Member of the Supreme Council of the Confederation of Kilkenny and as a Colonel in the pro-Royalist army. As a consequence of having supported the loosing side, Donogh was proclaimed a traitor by Cromwell and Clonmeen was confiscated and regranted to Sir Peter Courthorp. For his part Donogh was banished to Connaught where he built a house at Mountallen in County Clare. The O'Callaghans never returned to Clonmeen and their castle of the same name, the seat of the lordship, was burnt to the ground in 1690 by the forces of William of Orange. In the eighteeth century a cadet line of the Chiefly House settled in Spain rather than endure any longer the severity oi the notorious anti-Roman Catholic Penal Laws. In 1791 on the death of Edmond O'Callaghan, the last Chief of his Name resident in Ireland, the Chiefship vested in Don Ramon O'Callaghan, the then head of the Spanish branch. Don Ramon was the great-great-great grandfather of the present Chief, Don Juan.

In the summer of 1994 The O'Callaghan, Chief of the Name and titular Lord of Clonmeen, attended the annual general meeting of the Standing Council of Irish Chiefs and Chieftains at Cashel, and elected to membership.The princely house of O'Callaghan descends in unbroken male line from Morrough, second son of Ceallachan Caisil (Callaghan Cashel), King of Munster who died in the year 952. Morrough was thus the younger brother of Donnchad II of Munster, ancestor of the House of MacCarthy Mór. Closely related or not there was, at first, bitter and prolonged rivalry between the descendants of Morrough and King Donnchad. Because the succession to the throne of Munster was not determined by primogeniture but by tanistry, it was natural for the O'Callaghans to aspire to the Crown of their ancestor, Ceallachan, from whom they derived their surname.

 

Michael O'Callaghan & Marcella N ( modificado el 05.10.2009 )
Singles / Others / Otros / Callaghan ( modificado el / modified on 28.12.2009 )